First Aid for Choking

universalsignofchoking thumb First Aid for Choking Choking is the mechanical obstruction of the flow of air from the environment into the lungs. Choking prevents breathing, and can be partial or complete, with partial choking allowing some, although inadequate, flow of air into the lungs. Prolonged or complete choking results in asphyxiation which leads to hypoxia and is potentially fatal.

Choking can be caused by:

  • Introduction of a foreign object into the airway, which becomes lodged in the pharynx, larynx or trachea.
  • Respiratory diseases that involve obstruction of the airway.
  • Compression of the laryngopharynx, larynx or trachea in strangles.

Signs of Choking 

    • The person cannot speak or cry out, or has great difficulty and limited ability to do so.
    • Breathing, if possible, is labored, producing gasping or wheezing.
    • The person has a violent and largely involuntary cough, gurgle, or vomiting noise, though more serious choking victims will have a limited (if any) ability to produce these symptoms since they require at least some air movement.
    • The person desperately grabs at his or her throat or mouth, or attempts to induce vomiting by putting their fingers down their throat.
    • If breathing is not restored, the person’s face turns blue (cyanosis) from lack of oxygen.
    • The person does any or all of the above, and if breathing is not restored, then becomes unconscious.

choking thumb First Aid for Choking First Aid for Choking (For Adults, Pregnant Woman and Obese Person)

  1. Stand behind the victim and place your arms around him. Make a fist and place it against the victim’s abdomen, thumb side in, between the navel and the breastbone.
  2. Hold the fist with your other hand, and push upward and inward, four times quickly.
  3. For victims who are pregnant or obese, place your arms around the chest and your hands over the middle of the breastbone. Give four quick chest thrust.
  4. A victim who is lying down should be rolled over onto his or her back. Place your hands on the abdomen and push in the same direction on the body that you would if the victim were standing (inward, and toward the upper body).
  5. If you are not successful, open the mouth by lifting the jaw and tongue, and look for the swallowed object. If you can see the object, sweep it out with your little finger. Note: Never try to remove an object you can’t see because you may push it in more tightly.
  6. If the victim does not begin to breathe after the object has been removed from the air passages, use mouth to mouth resuscitation.
  7. Call for help, and repeat these steps until the object is dislodged and the victim is breathing normally.

chokingchildren thumb First Aid for Choking First Aid for Choking (For Young Children)

  1. Kneel next to the child who should be lying on his or her back.
  2. Position the heel of one hand on the child’s abdomen between the navel and the breastbone. Deliver six to ten thrust inward and toward the upper body.
  3. If this doesn’t work, open the mouth by lifting the jaw and tongue, and look for the swallowed object. If you can see the object, sweep it out with your little finger. Note: Never try to remove an object you can’t see because you may push it in more tightly.
  4. If the victim does not begin to breathe after the object has been removed from the air passages, use mouth to mouth resuscitation.
  5. Call for help, and repeat these steps until the object is dislodged and the victim is breathing normally.

  First Aid for Choking (For Infants)

  1. Hold the infant along your forearm, face down, so that the head is lower than the feet.
  2. Deliver five rapid blows to the back, between the shoulder blades, with the heel of your hand.
  3. If this doesn’t work, turn the baby over and, using two fingers, give four quick thrusts to the chest.

chokingbaby thumb First Aid for Choking chokinginfants thumb First Aid for Choking

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  1. billie says:

    brilliant came in very usefull

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